21st CENTURY

Social Studies

 

Fourth Grade Social Studies Content Standards and Objectives

 

Janet Benincosa, TI Specialist

 

Fourth grade Social Studies is an introduction to the growth of the United States from exploration and colonization (When The Three Worlds Meet) to the conclusion of the American Revolution.  Students will analyze the assimilation of various colonial groups, development of improved technology, major historical figures and events.  Students will also learn about the physical geography of North America and its influence upon diverse cultures.  Data collection and the essential roles of citizens in the democratic process will be emphasized.  Roles of elected officials, economic trade-offs and the need for taxation will be introduced.  Students will learn how the economic concepts of competition, advertising, budgeting and taxation impact production and consumption. 

 

The West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning include the following components: 21st Century Content Standards and Objectives and 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools. 

 

All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and content standards and objectives.

 

Grade 4

Social Studies

 

Standard:  1

Citizenship

 

SS.S.04.01

Students will

  • characterize and good citizenship by building social networks of reciprocity and trustworthiness (Civic Dispositions).

·        model a respect for symbols, ideas and concepts of the United States and analyze the roles of significant individuals (Respect For People, Events, and Symbols).

  • develop and employ the civic skills necessary for effective citizenship by using criteria to make judgments, arrive at and defend positions and evaluate the validity of the positions or data (Evaluation Skills).
  • develop the participatory skills of interacting, monitoring and influencing that are essential for informed, effective and responsible citizenship, including participation in civic life to shape public policy (Participatory Skills).
  • recognize and communicate the responsibilities, privileges and rights of United States citizens  (Civic Life). 

 

Performance Descriptors (SS.PD.04.1)

 

Distinguished

Above Mastery

Mastery

Partial Mastery

Novice

 

Fourth grade students performing at the distinguished level in citizenship justify reasons for being a part of civic life and model good leadership skills in the school.  They choose examples of local volunteer programs and compare and contrast the programs’ roles in the community and justify reasons for selection of one program to volunteer their time and efforts.  They research and summarize the events/purposes leading to the writing of the Declaration of Independence.  They compare and contrast the diversity of groups in early American society noting each group’s contributions.  They justify and generate examples of peaceful conflict resolution in different situations and different settings.

Fourth grade students performing at the above mastery level in citizenship summarize the characteristics or skills needed to be a good citizen within the school and community and to demonstrate leadership within the classroom.  They choose and participate in a volunteer program and evaluate personal and group accomplishments within the program.  Students examine the values, principles, and beliefs expressed in the Declaration of Independence. Students categorize groups representing diversity in early American society by their contributions.  They model peaceful conflict resolution in school and community settings.

Fourth grade students performing at the mastery level in citizenship evaluate the responsibilities, privileges and rights of U.S. citizenship and the importance of civic life, giving examples of responsible leadership.  They choose a volunteer program, set goals, and work independently and cooperatively to accomplish goals. They discuss the values, principles, and beliefs expressed in the Declaration of Independence.  They research diversity in early American society and give examples of the strengths/contributions of each.  They demonstrate peaceful conflict resolution within groups of people in schools and communities.

Fourth grade students performing at the partial mastery level in citizenship define civic life and give examples of responsible citizenship.  They give examples of people demonstrating responsible leadership.  Students recognize diversity of early American society and contributions made by different groups.  They recognize the role of the Declaration of Independence and the need for peaceful conflict resolution in the classroom and school.    

Fourth grade students performing at the novice level in citizenship identify examples of responsible citizenship and leadership.  Students recognize different groups of early American society.  They identify the Declaration of Independence.  They tell how to get along with other students in the classroom. 

 

 

Objectives

Students will

 

SS.O.04.01.01

Outline various public and private agencies in the community that provide services, explain why you would volunteer to help them, and then give examples of responsible leadership by individuals and groups in your community

 

SS.O.04.01.02

Identify and explain the commonly held democratic values, principles, and beliefs expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the significance of patriotic symbols, holidays, celebrations, and famous people.

 

SS.O.04.01.03

research forms of diversity in early American society, and give examples of the strengths/contributions of each (e.g., indentured servants, slaves, colonists, plantation owners, Native Americans, merchants).

 

SS.O.04.01.04

evaluate the responsibilities, privileges and rights of United States citizenship and the importance of civic life (e.g., voting, jury duty, obeying laws, freedom of speech, worship, paying taxes).

 

SS.O.04.01.05

research recent and historical conflicts concerning individual rights at the international, national, and local levels; then explain how those conflicts were resolved and suggest ways for peaceful conflict resolution.

 

Grade 4

Social Studies

 

Standard: 2

Civics/Government

 

SS.S.04.02

Students will

  • examine and analyze the purposes and basic principles of the United States government (Purposes of Government).
  • outline and evaluate and analyze the origins and meaning of the principles, ideals and core democratic values expressed in the foundational documents of the United States (Ideals of United States Democracy).
  • examine and distinguish the structure, function and responsibilities of governments and the allocation of power at the local, state and national levels (United States Government and Politics).
  • analyze how the world is organized politically and compare the role and relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs (United States Government and World Affairs).

Performance Descriptors (SS.PD.04.2)

 

Distinguished

Above Mastery

Mastery

Partial Mastery

Novice

 

Fourth grade students performing at the distinguished level in civics validate the rule of law and limited government in a democracy by citing specific examples of its usage, debate individual and group rights to dissent responsibly in a current situation, and reconstruct historical conflicts about individual rights and their resolutions.

 

Fourth grade students performing at the above mastery level in civics defend the rule of law and limited government in a democracy, defend individual and group rights to dissent responsibly in a current situation, and compare and contrast historical conflicts about individual rights and their resolutions.

Fourth grade students performing at the mastery level in civics justify the rule of law and limited government in a democracy, defend individual and group rights to dissent responsibly, and research historical conflicts about individual rights and their resolutions.

Fourth grade students performing at the partial mastery level in civics define and explain the rule of law and limited government in a democracy, explain individual and group rights to dissent responsibly, and examine historical conflicts about individual rights and their resolutions.

Fourth grade students performing at the novice level in civics identify the rule of law and limited government in a democracy, recognize the concept that individuals and groups have rights to dissent responsibly, and discuss historical conflicts about individual rights and their resolutions.

 

 

Objectives

Students will

 

SS.O.04.02.01

justify the rule of law and limited government and prove how they protect individual rights and the common good.

 

SS.O.04.02.02

defend the rights of individuals in the democratic process and the right of an individual or group (e.g., minorities, religious groups, women, children, elderly) to dissent responsibly

 

SS.O.04.02.03

identify and discuss the most significant points in George Washington’s farewell address.

Grade 4

Social Studies

 

Standard:  3

Economics

 

SS.S.04.03

Students will

  • analyze the role of economic choices in scarcity, supply and demand, resource allocation, decision-making, voluntary exchange and trade-offs (Choices).
  • research, critique and evaluate the roles of private and public institutions in the economy (Institutions).
  • compare and contrast various economic systems and analyze their impact on individual citizens (Economic Systems).
  • illustrate how the factors of production impact the United States economic system (Factors of Production).
  • analyze the elements of competition and how they impact the economy  (Competition).
  • examine and evaluate the interdependence of global economies (Global Economies).
  •  

 

Performance Descriptors (SS.PD.04.03)

 

Distinguished

Above Mastery

Mastery

Partial Mastery

Novice

 

Fourth grade students performing at the distinguished level in economics compare and contrast consumers and producers and their economic effect.  They develop hypothetical budgets, including trade-offs in simulated situations.  Students create criteria for selecting products in order to recommend choices consistent with a budget.  They debate factors that shaped the economy of the early colonies and evaluate those which affect the economy today.

Fourth grade students performing at the above mastery level in economics research the characteristics of consumers and products.  They develop a budget to reflect specific trade-offs   and design a budget based on price comparisons.  Students categorize factors that shaped the economy of the early colonies and summarize their relative importance.

Fourth grade students performing at mastery level in economics differentiate between consumers and producers of goods, explain trade-offs or choices and compromises and analyze how media affects consumer choices. They prioritize by importance factors that shaped the economy of the early colonies and the early United States and summarize their effects. They anticipate how competition affects prices and construct and interpret charts for price comparisons.

 

Fourth grade students performing at the partial mastery level in economics list examples of consumers and producers of trade-off or choices and compromises.  They select media examples of and show how they affect choice.  They illustrate how competition affects price and report how price affects choices.  Students discuss how identified factors shaped the economy of the early colonies.

Fourth grade students performing at the novice level in economics recognize examples of consumers and producers of goods.  They recognize trade-offs or choices and compromises.  They understand that media affects their choices.  Students recall and retell the concept of competition affecting price, and they understand that prices differ on selected products.  They identify factors that shaped the economy of the early colonies.

 

 

Objectives

Students will

 

SS.O.04.03.01

Explain and give examples of the following economic concepts:

·                  trade-offs or choices/compromise – opportunity costs (e.g., developing hypothetical budgets in simulated situations)

·                  people as consumers and as producers of goods

·                  effects of competition and supply-demand on prices

 

SS.O.04.03.02

analyze communications techniques that impact consumer choices (e.g., print/nonprint, advertisement, media)

 

SS.O.04.03.03

prioritize in order of importance the factors that shaped the economy of the early American colonies and identify the effects of the American Revolution on economic development and economic institutions.

 

SS.O.04.03.04

relate the concept of taxation to public services.

 

SS.O.04.03.05

summarize how slavery and indentured servitude influenced the early economy of the United States.

 

SS.O.04.03.06

construct and use charts, graphs, tables and grids to display data.

 

Grade 4

Social Studies

 

Standard:  4

Geography

 

SS.S.04.04

Students will

  • interpret, and choose maps, globes and other geographic tools to categorize and organize information about personal directions, people, places and environments (The World in Spatial Terms).
  • examine the physical and human characteristics of place and explain how the lives of people are rooted in places and regions (Places and Regions).
  • analyze the physical processes that shape the earth’s surface and create, sustain and modify the cultural and natural environment (Physical Systems).
  • analyze and illustrate how the earth is shaped by the movement of people and their activities (Human Systems).
  • analyze the interaction of society with the environment (Environment and Society).
  • point out geographic perspective and the tools and assess techniques available for geographic study (Uses of Geography).

Performance Descriptors (SS.PD.04.04)

 

Distinguished

Above Mastery

Mastery

Partial Mastery

Novice

 

Fourth grade students performing at the distinguished level in geography plan and construct maps of the Americas. Students select specific countries of the Americas and analyze the effects of physical and geographic factors on their development as a world region.      Students examine physical factors and determine their effect on the lives and locations of Native American nations before the arrival of the Europeans.

Fourth grade students performing at the above mastery level in geography plan, construct, and interpret maps.  They select a country in the Americas, locate and describe its physical features, and determine the importance of those features on the development of the country’s transportation, settlement patterns, and population density. Students determine its relationship to other countries in the world.  Students examine the effects of physical factors on the settlement patterns of Native Americans. 

Fourth grade students performing at the mastery level in geography plan and construct maps demonstrating knowledge of map skills. They locate North, South, and Central American countries and their major bodies of water and describe physical features of the Americas.  Students assess the effect of physical or geographic factors on the transportation and settlement patterns of the Americas.  They compare and contrast physical, economic, and political changes of America caused by geographic conditions and human intervention.  They compare and contrast the geographic factors that affect population density and analyze the effects on people’s lives and their interaction with the outside world.  Students locate areas of Native American nations before the arrival of Europeans. 

Students performing at the partial mastery level in geography construct simple maps and locate North and South American countries, their surrounding bodies of water, and physical features of each.  Students give examples of physical geographic factors affecting population, lives, and the relationships of people.  They locate areas of Native American nations before the arrival of Europeans in their locality or state. 

Students performing at the novice level  in geography locate North and South America and the two major oceans surrounding them.  Students list physical features that are common to both continents.  They relate how physical geographic factors affect the people’s lives and population.  They give names of Native American nations that existed before the arrival of Europeans in their area.

 

 

Objectives

Students will

 

SS.O.04.04.01

locate North, South and Central American countries and describe their major physical features (e.g., bodies of water, mountains, rivers, grasslands, oases) using geographic terms.

 

SS.O.04.04.02

Analyze and assess the effects of and explain how people adapted to geographic factors (e.g., climate, mountains, bodies of water) on the following:

  • transportation routes
  • settlement patterns and population density
  • culture (e.g., jobs, food, clothing, shelter, religion, government)
  • interactions with others (local, national, global)

 

SS.O.04.04.03

compare and contrast the physical, economic and political changes of America caused by geographic conditions and human intervention (e.g., bridges, canals, state boundaries, transportation).

 

SS.O.04.04.04

locate the settlement areas of the Native American nations and explain their lifestyle before the arrival of the Europeans.

 

SS.O.04.04.05

plan and construct maps to demonstrate knowledge of map skills (e.g., symbols in a legend/key. lines of demarcation [Equator, Prime Meridian, latitude and longitude, time zones, borders, coast lines], scales, directions [cardinal and intermediate] and geographic barriers).

 

Grade 4

Social Studies

 

Standard:  5

History

 

SS.S.04.05

Students will

  • organize, analyze and compare historical events, distinguish cause-effect relationships, theorize alternative actions and outcomes, and anticipate future application (Chronology).
  • use the processes and resources of historical inquiry to develop appropriate questions, gather and examine evidence, compare, analyze and interpret historical data  (Skills and Application).
  • examine, analyze and synthesize historical knowledge of major events, individuals, cultures and the humanities in West Virginia, the United States and the world  (Culture and Humanities).
  • use historical knowledge to analyze local, state, national and global interdependence  (Interpretation and Evaluation).
  • examine political institutions and theories that have developed and changed over time; and research and cite reasons for development and change  (Political Institutions).

Performance Descriptors (SS.PD.04.05)

 

Distinguished

Above Mastery

Mastery

Partial Mastery

Novice

 

Fourth grade students performing at the distinguished level in history compare and contrast sources of information to reconstruct the past.  They chronologically organize selected episodes of Native Americans, explorers, settlers, and colonists and summarize their importance.  They analyze data and reconstruct scenarios to predict a variety of possible outcomes.  Students prioritize the effects on U.S. colonization by 15th and 16th century European explorers. 

They evaluate factors influencing the founding of the original colonies, critique major leaders, and sequence events from American colonization through the Revolutionary War.  Students compare and contrast the areas and patterns of early American settlements. They research territorial expansion and population distribution.  Students justify ways in which explorers and settlers adapted to, used, and changed their environment. They discriminate between family and community life in various regions of Colonial America. Students prioritize the roles and responsibilities of colonial men, women, children, and elderly. They appraise cultural characteristics of the colonists and Native Americans to determine similar interests, responsibilities, and goals.  They justify the background similarities and differences, motivations, and occupational skills of people in English, French, and Spanish settlements.  Students debate reasons for going to war with England. They classify American leaders according to their reasons for choosing to go or not to go to war.

Fourth grade students performing at the above mastery level in history organize sources of information to reconstruct the past.  They chronologically organize selected episodes of Native Americans, explorers, settlers, and colonists and prioritize their importance.  They research, interpret and present data in timeline format to sequentially reconstruct the episodes.  Students research the explorations of 15th and 16th Century European explorers and discuss the importance of their effect on U.S. colonization.  They categorize factors influencing the founding of the original colonies and research major leaders and events from American colonization through the Revolutionary War.  Students research the areas and patterns of early American settlements and compare territorial expansion and population distribution.  Students classify ways in which explorers and settlers adapted to, used, and changed their environment. They interpret how and why family and community life differed in various regions of Colonial America.  Students categorize the roles and responsibilities of colonial men, women, children, and elderly.  They compare/contrast cultures of the colonists and Native Americans, appraising the characteristics of each culture that had the most positive effect on the other.  They critique background similarities and differences, motivations, and occupational skills of people in English, French, and Spanish settlements.  Students research events that led up to the decision to win independence from England.  They compare and contrast American leaders and their reasons for choosing to go to war.

Fourth grade students performing at the mastery level in history identify and analyze sources of information to reconstruct the past.  They chronologically organize selected episodes of Native Americans, explorers, settlers, and colonists and evaluate their importance.  They interpret and present data in timeline format.  Students compare and contrast the explorations of 15th and 16th Century European explorers and discuss their effect on U.S. colonization.  They research and compare factors influencing the founding of the original colonies and discuss major leaders and events from American colonization through the Revolutionary War.  Students identify areas and patterns of early American settlement and depict territorial expansion and population distribution.  Students critique ways in which explorers and settlers adapted to, used, and changed their environment, and compare/contrast how and why family and community life differed in various regions of Colonial America. Students compare the roles and responsibilities of colonial men, women, children, and elderly. They compare/contrast cultures of the colonists and Native Americans and describe the results of their interaction.  They explain background similarities and differences, motivations, and occupational skills of people in English, French, and Spanish settlements.  Students organize and categorize facts that led to the Revolutionary War.  They research the reasons why Americans and their leaders chose war to win independence from England.

Fourth grade students performing at the partial mastery level in history identify in history sources of information to reconstruct the past.  They chronologically organize selected episodes of Native Americans, explorers, settlers, and colonists.  They present data in timeline format.  Students outline the explorations of 15th and 16th Century European explorers and discuss their effect on U.S. colonization.  They compare factors influencing the founding of the original colonies and identify major leaders and events from American colonization through the Revolutionary War.  Students identify areas of early American settlements, territorial expansion and population distribution.  They research ways in which explorers and settlers adapted to, used, and changed their environment. They identify how and why family and community life differed in various regions of Colonial America.  Students list the roles and responsibilities of colonial men, women, children, and elderly. They research cultures of the colonists and Native Americans discuss the ways in which they interacted. They list background characteristics, motivations, and occupational skills of people in English, French, and Spanish settlements.  Students list facts and events that led to the Revolutionary War.  They discuss the reasons why Americans and their leaders chose war to win independence from England.

Fourth grade students performing at the novice level in history use sources of information to reconstruct the past.  They use a timeline to chronologically organize selected episodes of Native Americans, explorers, settlers, and colonists.  Students discuss the explorations of 15th and 16th Century European explorers and their effect on U.S. colonization.  They discuss factors influencing the founding of the original colonies and major leaders and events from American colonization through the Revolutionary War. Students discuss the different areas of early American settlements and territorial expansion and population distribution.  They identify ways in which explorers and settlers adapted to, used, and changed their environment. They discuss how and why family and community life differed in various regions of Colonial America.  Students describe the roles and responsibilities of colonial men, women, children, and elderly.  They cite characteristics of the cultures of the colonists and Native Americans and discuss the ways in which they interacted.  They discuss background characteristics, motivations, and occupational skills of people in English, French, and Spanish settlements.  Students discuss facts and events that led up to the Revolutionary War.  They distinguish between those leaders who chose to go to war and those who chose not to got to war to win independence from England.

 

 

Objectives

Students will

 

SS.O.04.05.01

create timelines to sequence and infer connections between events in major historical periods in U.S. history (e.g., discovery, colonization, revolution)

 

SS.O.04.05.02

chronologically organize and explain the influences of individuals and events discussed in the stories of Native Americans, explorers, settlers and colonists in North America through the Revolutionary Period.

 

SS.O.04.05.03

research and compare the influence of various factors of the founding of the original colonies (e.g., economic, geographic, political, religious).

 

SS.O.04.05.04

identify areas and patterns of early American settlement and depict territorial expansion and population distribution in the United States through maps, charts, pictures and research projects.

 

SS.O.04.05.05

list the European explorers of the 15th and 16th centuries, explain their reasons for exploration and the information gained from their journeys and then show how their travels in North America affected both North America and the rest of the world.

 

SS.O.04.05.06

Compare and contrast community life and family roles in various regions and social classes of colonial America.

 

SS.O.04.05.07

research how and why African Americans came to America and explain the motivation behind the development of slavery.

 

SS.O.04.05.08

chronologically organize and categorize the major events leading to and during the Revolutionary War; examine and explain why and how these events influenced choice made by different groups (e.g., Patriots, Loyalists, Native Americans) during this period.

 

SS.O.04.05.09

describe language, stories, music, folk tales, and artistic creations as expressions of culture that influenced the behaviors of people in colonial America. 

 

SS.O.04.05.10

compare and contrast the cultures of the colonists and Native Americans and describe the changes that occurred when they came into contact with one another. 

 

SS.O.04.05.11

explain the similarities and differences in backgrounds, motivations and occupational skills between people in the English settlements and those in the French and Spanish settlements. 

 

SS.O. 04.05.12

select, analyze, interpret and use information from various sources for reconstructing the past (e.g., documents, letters, maps, photos, newspaper articles) and prepare short reports that explain who, what, when, where, how and why events occurred as they did.

 

Grade 4

Social Studies

 

Standard: 6

Reading

 

SS.S.04.06

Students will

  • use the five reading components (phonemic awareness, phonics, background knowledge/vocabulary, high frequency word/fluency, comprehension, and writing) in their acquisition of social studies knowledge, insuring a foundation of college readiness in this genre.
  • recognize main ideas and supporting details to locate basic facts (e.g. names, dates, events).
  • distinguish relationships among people, ideas, and events.
  • recognize cause-effect relationships in content passages.
  • outline sequences of events.
  • summarize events and ideas. Infer main idea or purpose of content.
  • draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas and events.
  • write and edit organized texts of various genres to insure that information is clearly understood.

Refer to policy 2520.1 for specific grade level reading and writing objectives.