Physics II Content Standards and Objectives

 

Physics II advanced level course that is an elective designed for students who have completed Physics and desire a broader, in-depth study of physics content beyond those studied in Physics.As a college preparatory course, Physics II is a laboratory driven, advanced study of natureís universal laws with emphasis on process skills, using 21st century skills.This course is designed to build upon and extend the Physics concepts, skills, and knowledge from the science program.The course emphasizes a mathematical approach to the area of mechanics, thermodynamics, light and optics, electricity and magnetism and modern physics.Students will engage in active inquires, investigations, and hands-on activities for a minimum of 50% of the instructional time to develop conceptual understanding and research/laboratory skills.Safety instruction is integrated into all activities.The West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning include the following components:21st Century Content Standards and Objectives and 21st Century Learning Kills and Technology Tools.All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and content standards and objectives.

 

Janet Benincosa, Technology Curriculum Specialist

 

High School

Physics II

 

Standard: 1

Natural Science

 

SC.S.PII.1

Students will

         demonstrate an understanding of history and nature of science as a human endeavor encompassing the contributions of diverse cultures and scientists.

         demonstrate the ability to use the inquiry process to solve problems.

 

Performance Descriptors SC.PD.PII,1

 

Distinguished

Above Mastery

Mastery

Partial Mastery

Novice

 

Physics II students at the distinguished level will analyze the importance of scientific innovations to the utilization of scientific methodology, variability in experimental results to advances in societal, cultural and economic issues, design, conduct, communicate, evaluate and revise experiments utilizing safe procedures and appropriate technology; draw conclusions from multiple data sources and interpretation of models.

 

Physics II students at the above mastery level will analyze the importance of scientific innovation and recognize the role of these innovations in advancing societal, cultural and economic issues; use scientific methodology to design, conduct, communicate and revise experiments utilizing safe procedures and appropriate technology; draw conclusions from multiple data sources and models.

Physics II students at the mastery level will examine the importance of scientific innovation and recognize the role of these innovations in advancing societal, cultural and economic issues; use scientific methodology to conduct, communicate and revise experiments utilizing safe procedures and appropriate technology; draw conclusions from data sources and models.

Physics II students at the partial mastery level will describe the importance of scientific innovation and recognize the role of these innovations in advancing societal, cultural or economic issues; use scientific methodology to conduct and communicate experiments utilizing safe procedures and appropriate technology; select an appropriate conclusions from a list of possible conclusions drawn from experimental data.

Physics II students at the novice level will identify the importance of scientific innovations and associate these innovations with advances in societal, cultural or economic issues; conduct experiments utilizing safe procedures and appropriate technology; differentiate between observations and conclusions.

 

 

Objectives

Students will

 

SC.O.PII.1.1

formulate scientific explanations based on historical observations and experimental evidence, accounting for variability in experimental results.

 

SC.O.PII.1.2

demonstrate how a testable methodology is employed to seek solutions for personal and societal issues (e.g., ďscientific methodĒ).

 

SC.O.PII.1.3

relate societal, cultural and economic issues to key scientific innovations.

 

SC.O.PII.1.4

conduct and/or design investigations that incorporate the skills and attitudes and/or values of scientific inquiry (e.g., established research protocol, accurate record keeping, replication of results and peer review, objectivity, openness, skepticism, fairness, or creativity and logic).

 

SC.O.PII.1.5

implement safe procedures and practices when manipulating equipment, materials, organisms, and models.

 

SC.O.PII.1.6

use appropriate technology solutions with a problem solving setting to measure and collect data; interpret data; analyze and/or report data; interact with simulations; conduct research; and present and communicate conclusions.

 

SC.O.PII.1.7

design, conduct, evaluate and revise experiments (e.g., compose a question to be investigated, design a controlled investigation that produces numeric data, evaluate the data in the context of scientific laws and principles, construct a conclusion based on findings, propose revisions to investigations based on manipulation of variables and/or analyze of error, or communicate and define the results and conclusions).

 

SC.O.PII.1.8

draw conclusions from a variety of data sources to analyze and interpret systems and models (e.g., use graphs and equations to measure and apply variables such as rate and scale, evaluate changes in trends and cycles, predict the influence of external variances such as potential sources of error, or interpret maps).

 

High School

Physics

 

Standard: 2

Content of Science

 

SC.S.PII.2

Students will

         demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and applications of scientific facts, concepts, principles, theories, and models as delineated in the objectives.

         demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationships among physics, chemistry, biology, and the earth and space sciences.

         apply knowledge, understanding, and skills of science subject matter/concepts to daily life experiences.

 

 

Performance Descriptors SC.PD.PII.2

 

Distinguished

Above Mastery

Master

Partial Mastery

Novice

 

 

Physical Science II students at the distinguished level will differentiate among linear, quadratic, and inverse relationships found in graphs of motion in terms of position, velocity, acceleration, and time; evaluate data to deduce mathematical relationships involving one and two dimensional motion; critique experiments to verify laws of motion including Newtonís Laws, Conservation of Momentum, and Conservation of Energy; using knowledge of linear motion equations, synthesize concepts of rotational motion; design experiments to verify the effect of variables on the properties and dynamics of fluids; justify experimental results using concepts of thermal physics; appraise the relative values of electric force and field strength based on the magnitude of and the distance from the point charge; design, construct, diagram and evaluate complex electrical circuits; defend predictions and interpretations of magnetic forces and magnetic fields, and apply their effect on the motion of a point charge and to the electric current in a wire or coil; critique electromagnetic induction and justify its application to particular electric circuits and various devices; investigate, analyze, and evaluate the concepts of solid-state physics and the application of semiconductors and superconductors in the advancement of electronics through the development of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; assess and contrast the kinetic and potential energies and energy transformations of different oscillating systems; evaluate wave properties and their interactions; predict how optical and acoustical devices will incorporate new materials to improve their effectiveness; appraise the role of technology in the development of historical models of the atom; summarize and critique evidence for the historical development of the quantum mechanical theory; justify an atomís binding energy as related to Einsteinís special theory of relativity, and interpret the nuclear forces present; categorize nuclei based on their placement on the periodic table and proton to neutron ratio to demonstrate different types of decay processes.

 

 

 

 

Physical Science II students at the above mastery level will compose equations to express the relationships found in graphs of motion in terms of position, velocity, acceleration, and time; summarize data to deduce mathematical relationships involving one and two dimensional motion; design experiments to verify laws of motion including Newtonís Laws, Conservation of Momentum, and Conservation of Energy; using knowledge of linear motion equations, synthesize concepts of rotational motion; evaluate the effect of variables to the properties and dynamics of fluids; relate experimental results using concepts of thermal physics; summarize the relative values of electric force and field strength based on the magnitude of and the distance from the point charge; design, construct, diagram and evaluate complex electrical circuits; defend predictions and interpretations of magnetic forces and magnetic fields, and apply their effect on the motion of a point charge and to the electric current in a wire or coil; critique electromagnetic induction and evaluate its application to electric circuits and various devices; investigate, analyze, and evaluate the concepts of solid-state physics and the application of semiconductors and superconductors in the advancement of electronics through the development of diodes, transistors and integrated circuits; compare and contrast the kinetic and potential energies and energy transformations of different oscillating systems; analyze wave properties and their interactions; compare and contrast optical and acoustical devices for their effective application of wave properties; analyze the role of technology in the development of historical models of the atom; categorize evidence for the historical development of the quantum mechanical theory; analyze an atomís binding energy as related to Einsteinís special theory of relativity, and interpret the nuclear forces present; using the proton to neutron ratio, predict the type of nuclear decay that could occur for nuclei.

 

Physical Science II students at the mastery level will apply graphical analysis to interpret motion in terms of position, velocity, acceleration, and time; use data to deduce mathematical relationships involving one and two dimensional motion; experimentally verify laws of motion including Newtonís Laws, Conservation of Momentum, and Conservation of Energy; using knowledge of linear motion equations, synthesis concepts of rotational motion; predict and verify the effect of variables on the properties and dynamics of fluids; interpret and apply concepts of thermal physics; deduce the relative values of electric force and field strength based on the magnitude of and the distance from the point charge; construct, diagram and evaluate complex electrical circuits; predict and interpret magnetic forces and magnetic fields, and apply their effect on the motion of a point charge and to the electric current in a wire or coil; critique electromagnetic induction and evaluate its application to electric circuits and various devices; investigate, analyze, and evaluate the concepts of solid-state physics and the application of semiconductors and superconductors in the advancement of electronics through the development of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; apply knowledge of simple harmonic motion to calculate the kinetic and potential energies of the oscillating system; examine wave properties and their interactions; evaluate the application of wave properties of the development of optical and acoustical devices; critique the role of technology in the development of historical models of the atom; examine evidence for the historical development of the quantum mechanical theory; calculate an atomís binding energy as related to Einsteinís special theory of relativity, and interpret the nuclear forces present; differentiate between stable and nuclear nuclei, and if the nucleus is unstable predict he type(s) of nuclear decay.

 

Physical Science II students at the partial mastery level will draw motion graphs to show motion in terms of position, velocity, acceleration, and time; use data to deduce mathematical relationships involving one dimensional motion; recognize that laws of motion including Newtonís Laws, Conservation of Momentum, and Conservation of Energy can be verified experimentally; perform calculations involving the concepts of rotational motion; apply Pascalís Archimedesí, and Bernoulliís, principles in everyday situations; apply concepts of thermal physics; relate electric fields to electric forces and distinguish between them; construct, diagram and evaluate simple electrical circuits; relate magnetic forces and magnetic fields, and apply their effect on the motion of a point charge and to the electric current in a wire or coil; apply electromagnetic induction to electric circuits and various devices; investigate the concepts of solid-state physics and the application of semiconductors and superconductors in the advancement of electronics through the development of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; calculate the kinetic and potential energies of the oscillating system; review wave properties and their interactions; research the application of wave properties to the development of optical and acoustical devices; research the development of historical models of the atom; describe evidence for the historical development of the quantum mechanical theory; calculate an atomís binding energy as related to Einsteinís special theory of relativity; differentiate between stable and unstable nuclei and list types of decay that the unstable nuclei could display.

 

Physical Science II students at the novice level will measure distance and time to calculate velocity and acceleration; describe mathematical relationships involving one dimensional motion; perform experiments on motion topics including Newtonís Laws, Conservation of Momentum, and Conservation of Energy; define the concepts of rotational; define the properties and dynamics of fluids; state concepts of thermal physics; calculate the field strength using Coulombís Law; construct and diagram simple electrical circuits; relate magnetism to electric charge and electricity; describe electromagnetic induction; investigate the applications of semiconductors and superconductors in the advancement of electronics through the development of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; calculate the kinetic and/or potential energies of the oscillating system; list wave properties and their interactions; list optical and acoustical devices and identify the property that is the basis of the device; arrange the models of the atom historically; list evidence for the historical development of the quantum mechanical theory; calculate an atomís binding energy; define stable and unstable nuclei and list types of decay that the unstable nuclei could display.

 

 

Objectives

Students will

 

SC.O.PII.2.1

apply graphical analysis to interpret motion in terms of position, velocity, acceleration, and time.

 

SC.O.PII.2.2

use data to deduce mathematical relationships involving one and two dimensional motion.

 

SC.O.PII.2.3

experimentally verify laws of motion including Newtonís Laws, Conservation of Momentum (linear and angular), and Conservation of Energy.

 

SC.O.PII.2.4

using knowledge of linear motion equations, synthesize concepts of rotational motion (e.g., angular speed and acceleration, centripetal acceleration, Newtonian gravitation, Keplerís Laws, torque).

 

SC.O.PII.2.5

predict and verify the effect of variables on the properties and dynamics of fluids.

 

SC.O.PII.2.6

interpret and apply concepts of thermal physics (e.g., distinction of heat and temperature, thermal expansion, properties of Ideal Gases, Kinetic Theory, specific heat, and energy transfer).

 

SC.O.PII.2.7

deduce the relative values of electric force and field strength based on the magnitude of and the distance from the point charge (e.g., Coulombís Law and inverse square law).

 

SC.O.PII.2.8

construct, diagram and evaluate complex electrical circuits.

 

SC.O.PII.2.9

predict and interpret magnetic forces and magnetic fields, and apply their effect on the motion of a point charge and to the electric current in a wire or coil.

 

SC.O.PII.2.10

critique electromagnetic induction and evaluate its application to electric circuits and various devices.

 

SC.O.PII.2.11

investigate, analyze, and evaluate the concepts of solid-state physics and the application of semiconductors and superconductors in the advancement of electronics through the development of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits.

 

SC.O.PII.2.12

apply knowledge of simple harmonic motion (e.g., springs, pendulums and other oscillating objects) to calculate the kinetic and potential energies of the oscillating system.

 

SC.O.PII.2.13

examine wave properties and their interactions (e.g., reflection, refraction, dispersion, total internal deflection, interference, diffraction, Doppler Shift, beats, and polarization).

 

SC.O.PII.2.14

evaluate the application of wave properties to the development of optical and acoustical devices.

 

SC.O.PII.2.15

critique the role of technology in the development of historical models of the atom (e.g., radioactivity, atomic spectra, particle accelerators, etc.).

 

SC.O.PII.2.16

examine evidence for the historical development of the quantum mechanical theory (e.g., Planckís blackbody radiation, Einsteinís photoelectric effect, deBroglieís duality).

 

SC.O.PII.2.17

calculate an atomís binding energy as related to Einsteinís special theory of relativity, and interpret the nuclear forces present.

 

SC.O.PII.2.18

differentiate between stable and unstable nuclei, and if the nucleus is unstable predict the type(s) of nuclear decay.

 

High School

Physics II

 

Standard: 3

Application of Science

 

SC.S.PII.3

Students will

          demonstrate the ability to use inquiry process to explore systems, models, and changes.

          demonstrate an understanding of the interdependence between science and technology.

          demonstrate an understanding of the utilization of technology to gather data and communicate designs, results and conclusions.

         demonstrate an understanding of personal and societal benefits of science, and an understanding of public policy decisions as related to health, population, resource and environmental issues.

Performance Descriptors SC.PD.PII.3

 

Distinguished

Above Mastery

Mastery

Partial Mastery

Novice

 

Physics II students at the distinguished level will construct, test and analyze complex systems, models, and changes across science disciplines; use a technology solution and analyze the science used in the technology; evaluate how a scientific discovery impacts public policy decisions regarding health, population resources and environmental issues.

Physics II students at the above mastery level will construct, test and analyze data to explore systems, models and changes across science disciplines; analyze technological innovations and identify the science that makes them possible; evaluate the personal and societal benefits of a scientific discovery; assess the impacts of a public policy decision regarding health, population resources or environmental issues.

Physics II students at the mastery level will test, record and analyze data to explore systems, models, and changes; analyze a technological innovation and identify the science that makes it possible; assess positive outcomes and unintended consequences of a scientific discovery; explain the impacts of a public policy decision regarding health, population resources or environmental issues.

Physics II students at the partial mastery level will test and record data to explore systems, models, and changes; explain a technological innovation and identify the science that makes it possible; identify positive outcomes and unintended consequences of a scientific discovery; identify the impacts of public policy decision regarding health, population resources or environmental issues.

Physics II students at the novice level will test and record data to explore systems, models or changes; identify a technological innovation and the science that makes it possible; identify positive outcomes or unintended consequences of a scientific discovery; identify the impact of a public policy decision regarding health, population resources or environmental issues.

 

 

Objectives

Students will

 

SC.O.PII.3.1

synthesize concepts across various science disciplines to better understand the natural world (e.g., form and functions, systems, or change over time).

 

SC.O.PII.3.2

investigate, compare and design scientific and technological solutions to address personal and societal problems.

 

SC.O.PII.3.3

communicate experimental designs, results and conclusions using advanced technology tools.

 

SC.O.PII.3.4

collaborate to present research on current environmental and technological issues to predict possible solutions.

 

SC.O.PII.3.5

explore occupational opportunities in science, engineering and technology and evaluate the required academic preparation.

 

SC.O.PII.3.6

given a current science-technology-societal issue, construct and defend potential solutions.